VICE News spent the past few weeks with two young Bangkokians who hold different perspectives on their country's shifting politics. One is a pro-coup supporter who believes the army's move was necessary to restore order. The other is a young student activist bent on having his voice heard, even under the threat of detention.

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The junta is continuing to strike at the media and free speech, vowing to deal with any opposition or critics with force. Yet anti-coup sentiment is on the rise. Each day protesters appear on the streets in the evening in busy areas to call for a return to democracy. For all the army's threats, it has not yet used any deadly force against the protesters on the streets.

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Thailand's military detained former prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra on Friday in the latest development of the country's unraveling political crisis.

The army, which is consolidating its grip on Thailand following Thursday's coup d'état, barred 155 prominent citizens from leaving the country.

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Thailand's political crisis deepens, as the anti-government PDRC takes advantage of the political chaos following the ousting of Thailand's former caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and nine of her ministers last Wednesday.

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Thai caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and nine of her ministers were forced to step down Wednesday over allegations of abuse of power — which has ignited heated protests by members of the country's "Red Shirt" movement. 

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